Five reasons why you should hire an executive coach

This might sound like a marketing plug but “why should I hire an executive coach?” is easily one of the questions I am asked most often. I usually respond with a few questions: Would you expect to become a top athlete without a coach? Would you surround your children with educators to help them reach their potential? Would you invest in professional development for your staff?

 

The list of reasons why someone might benefit from a coach of any discipline is a long one. But, here are five reasons that seem to ring true for business professionals everywhere.

1. Every good coach needs a coach of their own.
The concept of ‘leader as coach’ isn’t new and even the best of leaders draw their clarity and ideas from the people, resources and experiences around them. In truth, most professional coaches invest in coaching to support their own personal, professional and organizational growth - why wouldn’t organizational leaders do the same?

2. It’s lonely at the top.
We don’t always have the people around to help work through strategy, ideas, and issues. And often we’re reticent to bring those ideas forward before their fully flushed out. The coach is a sounding board - when your brilliant ideas aren’t yet ready for prime time.

3. It’s easy to fall out-of-touch with current trends or alternative approaches.
When I want to ensure I’m staying current with trends and leading edge thinking, the coach brings a new tool set to fast track my performance. When I want to build upon  my usual problem-solving tactics and address those that aren’t working.

4. Accountability is king.
No matter what goals we set for ourselves -  life can get in the way. A coach can help drive focus and keep us on target by helping me identify where I need to focus, and keeping me on target.

5. Even the best can be better.
The strongest of leaders adopt a continuous learning approach. The value of a second set of eyes to provide feedback on my strategy, my approach and any associated risks can’t be overlooked.